Domenic Mauro B.A., IFBB Press Commission
Domenic is known by many for signing and working with some of the top athletes, celebrities and models in the bodybuilding industry. He’s worked with approximately 200 athletes including IFBB Pros such as Mr. Olympia Jay Cutler, Dexter Jackson, Branch Warren, Johnnie Jackson, Ms. Figure Olympia Davana Medina and Jenny Lynn, IFBB Pro fitness sensation Allison Ethier, diet guru Chad Nicholls, trainer of champions Charles Glass, The Biggest Loser T.V. show’s celebrity trainer Kim Lyons, Actress/Model Carmen Electra, WWE star Torrie Wilson, Bigger, Faster, Stronger star Christian Boeving and number of professional MMA fighters. He’s also rubbed shoulders with industry and sport legends Joe and Ben Weider, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone, Mike Tyson, Triple H, Randy Couture, Dana White and 8 time Mr. Olympia Ronnie Coleman! Aside from the high profile names, Domenic has also put together numerous events for the companies he’s worked for including the Mr. Olympia, Arnold Classic and countless NPC and IFBB Shows. In addition to working with the top supplement companies in the world, he has had the privilege of working on the sales and marketing of world class events as the Super Bowl, Pro Bowl, the PGA Tour, and CTV Olympic Games Broadcast. Domenic majored in Kinesiology and Health Sciences while attending York University in Toronto and graduated with degree in Human Psychology.
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Photo Manipulation

QUESTION: In another mag I saw a pro posing in the gym who had the most insane bodypart proportions yet I saw the same pro onstage, and he didn’t look even close to what he did a few pages back. What gives?

ANSWER: According to industry veteran Nathan Hinks, a few explanations suggest themselves. Here's what Nathan had to say:

"Depending on the kind of camera lens the photographer was using, the bodybuilder might have appeared wider and larger than he normally was. Photographers sometimes use a wide-angle lens in gym shoots to make the muscle group being focused on look larger and more impressive. It could also be simply the difference between a competitor who’s shot onstage and then shot two days after a contest, when he’s been able to eat and really fill out. Either scenario is possible. A new practice has emerged, however, that’s just plain wrong. Pics in some bodybuilding mags are being morphed to make the models look much bigger and even leaner than they actually are. Muscles are blown out, and waists are being tapered in to inhuman proportions. I’ve seen this done to images used in supplement ads and training and gym shoots. You can see from the pics of me below how a good art director can add inches to someone’s arms. While I feel that morphing is inappropriate and misleading, it’s especially bad for the bodybuilder whose image gets morphed. Very likely he didn’t have any say in the matter."